3-dogs

JSAC and Brownie’s Story!

 

Welcome everyone to a new segment of my website where I will feature a dog for adoption from the local Canine Rescue and Adoption Shelter.

 

The Shelter I am referring to is the Jersey Shore Aninmal Center. This is the Animal Center where I adopted my Chance a little over two years ago. They have so kindly given me permission to feature their dogs in my articles.

My intention is to create a regular series on this website. It’s mission will be not only to educate and inform, but open your mind to adopting instead of shopping for your next fur friend.

 

After all; don’t dogs need to be in a good, nuturing home environment, surrounded by loving family members, just like you and me? Of course they do!

 

This first article will introduce you to the shelter and the great work they are performing on behalf of all animals, not only dogs.

 

After that I will introduce you to the dog we chose to be the very first one featured in my series. So what do you say, shall we get started? I thought you might agree, so here we go!

 

Jersey Shore Animal Center – JSAC


 

Jersey Shore Animal Center was founded in 1981. According to the Executive Director, the shelter philosopy is “There is HOPE for those who enter here”.

 

From what I was able to observe and experience when I adopted, this is a magical place for unwanted, abandoned, sick animals to be because they are committed to the care of  these animals and to represent them in the adoption, ensuring the  animals are placed in responsible, loving homes.

 

Their goal is to adopt out these special animals to the caring and loving forever homes they so deeply deserve.

 

Jersey Shore Animal Center is also an advocate for responsible spay/neuter practices & annual vet care. They help educate families about pet ownership, provide pet therapy to residents of area nursing homes, instruct school children in choosing the right pet for their home and support other animals welfare organizations and rescues.

 

Veterinary care is provided as needed, medication and inoculations are given and neutering/spaying is done prior to adoption unless the animal’s health or age precludes this procedure. They strive to make the JSAC a place of refuge, safety, love and kindness for animals awaiting adoption.

 

A compassionate staff tends to providing for each animal’s physical and emotional needs, taking care to keep each one sheltered, clean, well-fed and socialized.

 

Since adopting my Chance, I’ve been to the shelter a few times to drop off some donations and I was there again today.  In speaking with the Executive Director, I learned that JSAC is a No-Kill shelter.

 

For those who may not know, this means that they don’t euthanize any animal due to shelter overcrowdedness. They only euthanize when the animal is suffering and it’s quality of life is beyond what can be cured with medical intervention.

 

They do not receive federal, state or county funding and only rely on private donors to support their programs and services. JSAC is not affiliated with, nor a partner with any other shelter.

 

They do not receive funds from the Humane Society of the United States, The ASPCA, the New Jersey SPCA or the Associated Humane Society.

 

JSAC is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors and employs 15 full and part time personnel. JSAC has an active and dedicated group of more than 100+ volunteers who continue to make the shelter a success.

 

Services In Detail


 

JSAC-Brochure-1

 

JSAC-Brochure-2

 

SPAYING OR NEUTERING YOUR PET IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT!

 

Spaying and neutering your pet is extremely important, not only to curb pet overpopulation, but also for the health of your pet.

 

Spaying and/or neutering greatly reduces, or eliminates the risk of several types of cancer and can help prevent unwanted behaviors such as spraying, fighting and roaming.

 

VACCINATING YOUR PET IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT, SO WE NOW OFFER LOW COST VACCINES  ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH!

 

Your pet will be given a brief physical exam prior to the vaccines by a veterinarian and with the assistance of a technician, therefore animals must be in good health to receive vaccinations and other services. Pets with health concerns may not be vaccinated and should be seen by a full service veterinary clinic.

 

FIND A VETERINARIAN

 

JSAC will provide you with a list of Veterinarians in the Ocean and Monmouth County area for your informational purposes only.

 

They do not endorse any of the Veterinarians on the list. It’s entirely up to you, which one you choose.

 

 

BELOW ARE HOW TO FIND A LOST PET

 

 

If you have lost your pet, please do not waste time – begin the search as soon as you notice you pet is missing.  Below are suggestion for steps you can take:

 

  • Search your home carefully, especially behind appliances, under beds, in closets, in a basement or garage, under a deck, under a shed or anyplace that an animal may be hiding. No place is too small or out of the way. Use a flashlight to look under and into dark places. Squeak a favorite toy where your pet might hear it and possibly identify the way home.

  • Ask anyone including neighbors, mail carriers, children and passersby. Show them a photo of your pet. Even if they have not seen him/her, they may be willing to keep an eye out for them.

  • Create a LOST FLYER with your pet’s photo, a brief description and your phone number. Distribute the flyers/posters and put them on telephone poles in the area where you lost your pet. If possible, walk the neighborhood and leave flyers in mail boxes or at front doors.

  • Put a “Lost Pet” ad in the local newspapers. The ad should be titled “Lost Cat” or “Lost Dog” and should include your phone number, the date your pet went missing, where it was last seen, and a clear, brief description containing the animal’s name, breed, sex, age and whether it was wearing a collar.

  • Go to all of the shelters in your area – don’t just call them. Give them a color photo of your pet with your phone number on it. Ask if you can post your flyer in their lobby or front desk. Ask to see the animals in the shelter to make sure yours is not there.

  • Go back and check the shelters and/ or make a call to see if the animal has been brought in as a stray.

  • Call your local animal control officer in all the surrounding towns. Send each a photo or flyer. Give them as much information as possible.

  • Call area veterinary clinics and send them a photo of your pet with your telephone number on it. Ask if they will post your flyer in their lobby or at the front desk.

  • If you suspect that your pet has been stolen, report your pet missing to your local police department. They may know if an animal fitting your pet’s description has been hit by a car or taken to your local shelter.

  • Read the Pet Found section in each of your local papers every day. Many papers run “found” ads for free. Follow up on any ad that describes an animal similar to yours, since you can’t rely on the finder to describe your pet exactly as you would.

  • Look around your neighborhood carefully several times. Cats can wander into a neighbor’s basement or garage, fall asleep and accidentally get locked or shut in.

  • Late at night or very early in the morning, when the area is quiet, go to the place you suspect your pet was lost. Bring his favorite food and a flashlight. Call his name and see if he/she shows up. Try this repeatedly.

  • If your pet is an indoor pet who does not usually get out, place his/her litter box or dog bed outside, where it may recognize their own scent and find their home. (Do not clean out the litter box)

  • If your pet is registered with a lost-pet network, call them right away.

  • If you are so inclined, you might try the help of a person or business that helps locate lost pets. Make sure they are well known and reputable.

  • Lastly, but not least, if you find your pet, notify your local animal shelter.

 

TO REPORT A LOST PET

 

Losing your pet can be traumatic and we urge you not to waste time – begin your search as soon as you notice your pet is missing. If you want to report a lost pet you can begin by filling out our online questionnaire and submitting it to our Lost and Found.

 

This report is for informational purposes only. If you lost or found a pet in Brick, NJ please contact the Ocean County Animal Facility, 732-657-8086 or A-Academy Animal Control 800-624-1709.

 

 

PET FIRST AID KIT

 

If your pet has any special conditions or needs, ask your veterinarian what additional items he/she would suggest you include in your pet first aid kit. Please remember to keep all medications away from children.

 

Here’s a list of the essential items that should be included in your pet first aid kit.

 

  • Latex gloves

  • Gauze sponges (available at most pharmacies) in a variety of sizes

  • Roll gauze – 2” width

  • Roll bandages, such as gauze wrap that stretches and clings. These are available in most pharmacies, pet stores or pet catalogs

  • Material to make a splint. This can include pieces of wood, newspaper and sticks

  • Hypo-allergenic adhesive tape

  • Non-adherent sterile pads. These make excellent dressings

  • Small scissors

  • Grooming clippers (available in pet stores and pet catalogs) or a safety razor

  • Nylon leash – at least one

  • Towel(s)

  • Muzzle. A cage muzzle is ideal, but a soft collapsible one may be more convenient. Get one you already know fits your pet. If you do not want to purchase one, at least have enough roll gauze to improvise.

  • Compact thermal blanket or regular blanket

  • Pediatric rectal thermometer (may be digital)

 

 

Find out More About JSAC

 

Pets For Patriots


 

The Jersey Shore Animal Center has partnered with the Pets for Patriots Organizations Forget Me Not program.

 

The mission of Pets for Patriots is “to give the gifts of fidelty, joy and love to veterans and pets through companion animal adoption”. This mission statement was taken directly from the organization’s website.

 

Being a veteran myself, I can fully appreciate the efforts of JSAC and Pets for Patriots. No Vet or Pet ever wants to be forgotten or feel unwanted.

 

I applaud both organizations for bringing pets and Vets together for mutual companionship. It’s a wonderful thing.

 

 

Find out More About Pets For Patriots

 

 

Meet Brownie


 

 

BrownieBrownie was adopted from us back in 2015.  The county shelter called JSAC and told them that she had been surrendered there by her owner’s girlfriend.

 

JSAC was saddened to get this news, so they immediately went to the county shelter and picked her up.

 

Brownie is a 6 years old and 60lbs, female Cattle Dog/Shepherd Mix.

 

 

She has Brown/Chocolate – with White coloring. She is spayed, is up to date with her shots and is housebroken.

 

She has been homeless since November 23, 2019. Surrending any animal before the holidays has to be very disheartening for the animal.

 

Would you want to be dumped and abandoned just before the holidays? I don’t think so and I’m sure Brownie felt the same way!

 

Now she’s back with JSAC and looking for a new home. She has gained a substantial amount of weight Brownie-2so the shelter staff has her on a doggy diet, so she can get back to a healthy weight.

 

She has lived with kids over 8 but can be picky about her dog friends, so she may be better suited as an only pet.

 

JSAC is hoping the next family to adopt Brownie will be a forever one!

 

Hopefully the family that adopts Brownie, will give her lots of love and exercise!  Brownie is waiting for you…..please go see her today! She’s just waiting for someone to love her unconditionally!

Will The End Does Justify The Means!


 

Although my segments will involve one of the local shelters in my area, I hope they will help to educate and inform everyone around the world about the adoption and care of a dog.

 

I hope it motivates you to adopt and not shop. Besides being a very selfless thing to do, adoption costs less and keeps the population of shelters low.

 

You may be in my local area, another state or somewhere on the other side of the world, however the adoption principle is the same.

 

A shelter life, although well taken care of (most of the time) is no life for a dog.  Hope you enjoyed this segment!

 

 

We would like to hear from you. If you have questions about adoptions, shelter life at JSAC or more information about Brownie, please leave comments below and we will be happy to respond.

 

All the best!

Barbara

Founder: My Everything For Your Dog 🐶

“Saving one animal won’t change the world, but for that one animal, the world changes forever”

Who-rescued-who-logo

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
Learn how to train your dog with this free training guide!

pet-expertise

You have successfully subscribed to the newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

Love A Rescue Dog will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing.